Not too unusual for a condenser, but pretty dang impressive for a dynamic. So can anyone speak of experiences with any of these mics tracking high gain amps that can help me make a final decision? Mix it with a ribbon, and you've got tons of tonal options. Not sure why you want the pr20 or pr40 for guitars? That's pretty cool service. PR40 plus SM57 would be worth trying on guitar cabs. When I added them together, it was the perfect marriage: The PR30 made up for the upper-mids and top end that was lacking on the 57, while the 57 brought up the lower-mids. For such large mics, the Heils are deceptively light (each is in the neighborhood of 1 lb). The number of mic companies that don't make wireless, and the number of wireless companies that don't make microphones is today pretty small. 421 and a ribbon will usually give plenty of tone options on gtr. Prices: PR30, $299; PR40, $375; and SM2B shock-mount, $95. ... although I do notice that some people apparently like the PR30 better than the PR40, so there isn't unanimity that the PR40 … When you buy products through links across our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. I first isolated both mics to hear the difference. Both go for about the same price, with the Shure SM7B being about $50 dollars … Heil PR40 vs. Shure SM7B Comparison! As mentioned, the mic has a tendency to round out transient hits when used with a high-SPL source, and the snare was no different. The PR30 is the Heil mic best suited for electric guitar. Just a friendly reminder that political discussion, (including "offhand" and 'sideways' commenting) is. Sennheiser MD421 vs Heil PR30 (+ Shure SM57) Thread starter iggs; Start date Jan 11, 2011; iggs Member. I have recently been trying to decide between the Heil PR-20 and the Senn MD421 for recording high... Heil PR20 vs PR40 Vs Senn MD421 For electric guitar - Gearslutz not registered yet? Mic Database | Mic Reviews | Microphone Sale, TapeOp Issue #56/November, 2006 | by Pete Weiss, See specifications, reviews, & mods for the Heil Sound PR-30, See specifications, reviews, & mods for the Heil Sound PR-40. One way to harvest great tones from a drum kit is to mike the toms’ top and bottom heads. Similarities & Differences 1… ...the PR20? I will outline the PR40, compare it to the PR30, and then give a recommendation in my Final Word A rundown: 1. Read more about the Heil Sound PR-40 dynamic microphone. Even though the Heil PR30 (right) and PR40 large-diaphragm dynamic mics look like side-address models, they are front-firing. Read more about the Heil Sound PR-30 dynamic microphone. Both mics were equidistant from the grille cloth and about four inches off the edge of the dust cone. Lately, legendary audio innovator Bob Heil has become more well-known for his institutional sound reinforcement and broadcast products than for creations such as the Heil Talk Box and Grateful Dead–optimized PA systems. if you are on the lookout for a ribbon mic for electric guitar , the MXL R40 might just blow your mind for under $100 at Musician's Friend. Seems to me your PR20 is not working as it should. Not to hijack, but a note to Frans and BamBamBoom....I contacted Heil Sound and got a letter from Bob Heil himself (or so it seems). On paper i think it would work but i've never tried it. An optional SM2B shock-mount fits either mic. If you roll off some lows and highs, you can get a similar sound with a 421 as with a 906. I still prefer a good old 57 for open back cabs though. PR40, hands down. What you will need? After talking to Bob Heil about his mic line during this year’s NAB show in Las Vegas, I was intrigued. I consider both of these microphones, the Heil PR40 and the Shure SM7B, to be one of the best dynamic microphones available today. However, you can't make a 906 sound like a 421, which has a much more extended frequency response. I like both but now i have heard that garlic is worth a look at as well.". The PR30 and PR40 worked well as a team on a low tom, with the PR30 on top and the PR40 providing added low tone from underneath. Pros 4. Mine have a pronounced and solid bottom, good for the root note of chords or the body of a snare. Consensus/Conclusion 10. Heil PR40 vs. Shure SM7 Sign in to disable this ad Some folks seem to hate these invitations to compare, others seem to thrive on them. But I recently checked out a couple of Heil microphones courtesy of TransAudio Group, the worldwide distributors of Heil. Should have the receipt nearby. Well, I still love my RE20 and will continue to use it, but the Heil mics’ modest prices (at about half what an RE20 costs), high quality, and extended frequency response would make me hesitate to recommend the RE20 exclusively. Even though the Heil PR30 (right) and PR40 large-diaphragm dynamic mics look like side-address models, they are front-firing. It should be noted that the RE20 has changed over the years. Like tinfoil. But now i have heard that the PR-40 is worth a look at as well. When I added a Shure SM81 to the bottom of the drum and flipped the polarity to pick up the snare component, it mixed very well with the PR30, providing plenty of snap to the drum and overall mix. Update my browser now, SURPRISING RICH TONE, VERSATILITY FROM DYNAMIC MODELS, By Kevin Becka Lately, legendary audio innovator Bob Heil has become more well-known for his institutional sound reinforcement and broadcast products than for creations such as the Heil Talk Box and Grateful Dead–optimized PA systems. Stick attack and transient response from the PR30 had the tom sounding great on top, while the feed provided by the PR40 from the bottom added lots of warm low-frequency tone to the mix, making it a winner in this application. I really like the Sennheiser e906 for distorted guitar. The PR30 is 6.5×1.75 inches, weighs in at a trim 9 ounces and uses a large 1.5-inch transducer. Visit our corporate site. Its shape, weight and sturdy standmount allow you to tuck the mic into tight spaces without fearing that it will sag or get in the way of drums or other adjacent mics. Pitting my venerable RE20 against the PR40 yielded close to identical sonic characteristics. I found these mics ideal not only for voiceovers, but also for loud rock vocals, kick drums, toms, guitar, and bass cabinets. I tend to leave my hype filter set on high for any review, and I must admit I was a bit skeptical about his claims, but I couldn’t have been more wrong.