Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers. See on Romans 1:25. ΄ὴ γένοιτο] Let it not be (see on Romans 3:4), namely, that we continue in sin. A man that is dead is uninfluenced and unaffected by the affairs of this life. All rights reserved. See on Romans 1:25. God forbid By which he expresses his abhorrence of such a practice, and that this was a consequence which did not follow from the premises, and was far enough from his thoughts, and which he had in the greatest detestation: and he further argues against it by asking. He is insensible to sounds, and tastes, and pleasures; to the hum of business, to the voice of friendship, and to all the scenes of commerce, gaiety, and ambition. We died with Him. In Chapters 6 and 7 he interrupts his argument temporarily to deal with two very practical qu… (Rom. The power working in a believer either comes from the old sin nature or the new life in Christ – but when Christ died He not only died FOR sin, which is paying the price of sin(death) - but He died UNTO sin, which is providing victory over the dominating sin nature and permanently severing us from the power it has over us. God forbid By which he expresses his abhorrence of such a practice, and that this was a consequence which did not follow from the premises, and was far enough from his thoughts, and which he had in the greatest detestation: and he further argues against it by asking, The relative clause is put first with rhetorical emphasis, in order at once to make the absurdity of the maxim plainly apparent. In the closing part of Chapter 5, the apostle began to describe to us the tremendous change that was introduced by Jesus Christ when he died on the cross and rose again from the dead -- the breakthrough in history that came when the second Adam came in to undo, by means of his death and resurrection, what the first Adam did to us the Garden of Eden. May it never be! If in virtue of union with Christ, we are dead with him, and freed from the penalty of sin, shall not the same union secure our deliverance from its dominion? of We need to understand that the sin nature remains with us until our life on earth is ended – but the blood of Christ has given us victory over the functioning power of the sin nature within our life. Romans 6:2. "How shall we that are dead to sin, live any longer therein?" How shall we? how shall we that are dead to sin, live any longer therein? Copyright © 2020, Bible Study Tools. Live any longer therein - How shall we, who have become sensible of the evil of sin, and who have renounced it by solemn profession, continue to practice it? (Considerable difficulty exists in regard to the meaning of the expression "dead to sin? California - Do Not Sell My Personal Information. Article Images Copyright © 2020 Getty Images unless otherwise indicated. We familiarly speak of a man's being dead to sensual pleasures, to ambition, etc., to denote that they have lost their influence over him. &c. The thing is impracticable: for, for a gracious soul to live in sin, would be to die again, to become dead in sin, which cannot be; he that lives and believes in Christ shall never die, spiritually or eternally. He did not attempt to show by abstruse argument that this consequence did not follow; but he appeals at once to Christian feeling, and shows that the supposition is abhorrent to that. REVIEW OF ROMANS 6:1-2a Romans 6 has to do with the Christian's progressive victory over the power of present sin in his life — evil thoughts, lusts, temper, laziness, failure to witness, envy, hate, jealousy pride, etc. Now Christians are one with Christ. The apostle does not here attempt to prove that Christians are thus dead, nor to state in what way they become so. The expression is not infrequent in the New Testament; Galatians 2:19, "For I ...am dead to the law;" Colossians 3:3, "For ye are dead, and your life is hid with Christ in God;" 1 Peter 2:24, "Who ...bare our sins ...that we, being dead to sin," etc. The reason is drawn from the fact that we are dead in fact to sin. They do not live to sin; nor has sin dominion over them. His death cancelled every obligation. That great contrast runs all through the second part of Chapter 5. It is impossible for these who are dead to act as if they were alive. God forbid. Μὴ γένοιτο] Let it not be (see on Romans 3:4), namely, that we continue in sin. οἵτινες] as those who, contains the reason (of the πῶς ἔτι κ. τ. λ [1381]). Henceforth, sin had no more power to exact anything at his hands. The expression used here by the apostle is common in all languages. See on Romans 1:25. Just as the work of the cross provides salvation when we believe it to be true - in the same way the work of the cross also provides victory over the old sin nature when it is believed. All Christians are thus in fact dead to sin. The relative clause is put first with rhetorical emphasis, in order at once to make the absurdity of the maxim plainly apparent. &c. The thing is impracticable: for, for a gracious soul to live in sin, would be to die again, to become dead in sin, which cannot be; he that lives and believes in Christ shall never die, spiritually or eternally. There is a death for sin, a death in sin, and a death to sin; the latter is here mentioned, and persons may be said to be "dead to sin", both as justified and sanctified: justified persons are dead to sin, inasmuch as that is not imputed to them to condemnation and death; they are discharged from it; it cannot hurt them, or exert its damning power over them; it is crucified, abolished, and made an end of by Christ: sanctified persons are dead to sin; sin is not made their business, it is not their course of life; it is no longer a pleasure to them, but is loathsome and abominable; it is looked upon, not as a friend, but an enemy; it does not reign, it has not the dominion over them; it is subdued in them, and its power weakened; and as to the members of the flesh, and deeds of the body, it is mortified: to live in sin, is to live after the dictates of corrupt nature; and persons may be said to live in it, when they give up themselves to it, are bent upon it; when sin is their life, they delight in it, make it their work and business, and the whole course of their life is sinful: now those who are dead to sin, cannot thus live in it, though sin may live in them; they may fall into sin, and lie in it some time, yet they cannot live in it: living in sin, is not only unbecoming the grace of God revealed in the Gospel, but is contrary to it; it is detestable to gracious minds, yea, it seems impossible they should live in it; which is suggested by this question, "how shall we?" It is just as absurd to suppose that a Christian should desire to live in sin as that a dead man should put forth the actions of life. "The strength of sin is the law," which demands satisfaction to its injured honor, and insists on the infliction of its penalty. When Christ died unto sin. We died unto sin. "The law has dominion over a man so long only as he liveth." Mr. Scott seems to have felt this difficulty, for, having explained the phrase of "separation from iniquity, as a dead man ceases from the actions of life," he immediately adds, "not only ought this to be the believer's character, but in a measure it actually is so." Romans 6:2 NIV Romans 6:2 NLT Romans 6:2 ESV Romans 6:2 NASB Romans 6:2 KJV Romans 6:2 Bible Apps Romans 6:2 Biblia Paralela Romans 6:2 Chinese Bible Romans 6:2 French Bible Romans 6:2 German Bible Alphabetical: any be By can died how in it live longer May means never no shall sin still to We who NT Letters: Romans 6:2 May it never be! (2) The benefits of justification and sanctification are always inseparable joined together, and both of them proceed from Christ by the grace of God: now sanctification is the abolishing of sin, that is, of our natural corruption, whose place is taken by the cleanness and pureness of a reformed nature. It has, however, been objected to this view, that it is inconsistent with fact, since Christians, so far from being insensible to sin, are represented in the next chapter as carrying on a perpetual struggle with it. for it was never otherwise with him. At rebirth Christ’s work on the cross permanently severed the power that flowed from the old sin nature into the life of the new believer. "If we be dead with Christ, we believe that we shall also live with him. The unsaved sinner is permanently “plugged into” the old sin nature, which is the only power behind the functioning of the life of every unbeliever. On the whole, then, the expression "dead to sin," is to be regarded as entirely parallel with that other expression in the seventh chapter, "dead to the law," that is, completely delivered from its authority as a covenant of works, and more especially from its power to condemn. οἵτινες] as those who, contains the reason (of the πῶς ἔτι κ. τ. λ (1381)). It is not probable. There he said that as sin increased, God's grace for those who trusted in Christ's death for their sin increased even more. Romans 6:2. He assumes the fact without argument. It would be well for the reader to note at once the corrections suggested in the rendering of this verse by Dr. Lightfoot’s criticism:—In Romans 6:4, “we were buried” for “we are buried;” in Romans 6:6, “the old man was crucified” for “is crucified;” in Romans 6:8, “if we died” for “if we be dead.”.